To be king or not to be king, that’s the question

Hi everyone! I’m sorry it took me so long to write more on my blog, but I was on a trip to New York :). I had a lovely time and I was so happy to meet Rozsa Gaston, one of my readers  and sort of a mentor to me. She’s  an author and I’m reading her book Budapest Romance right now. It’s a romantic story about a Hungarian girl that meets a guy that is Dutch (like me!) but they have only 6 days to decide whether or not they will be a couple, because they meet on holiday and she lives in New York and he lives in Holland. I’m especially looking forward to her upcoming book Sense of Touch about Anne of Brittany :).

But today I was going to write about Joanna and Philip who had finally arrived in Spain  and met with Joanna’s parents and things seemed fine but the Flemish nobility is unhappy with the Spanish plans to crown Philip as their king because this would make it harder for them to control Philip in the future and he might gets ideas in his head like he could raise the taxes in Flanders. Especially Philips chief advisor van Buijsleden was against it and he tried to convince Philips to refuse to become the king of Spain. The Spanish sensed Philips hesitation and they probably had a good idea who caused this doubt. Ferdinand went to Saragossa on the 18th of July  to prepare the ceremonies. The Flemish did not enjoy the summer in Spain in the least. It was way to hot for them and the Spanish had not forgotten the poor treatment they received in Flanders when their army unexpectedly had to stay over in the winter so they weren’t all that helpful now that the tables were turned and the Flemish soldiers started to get sick and die. Philip didn’t want to stay in Toledo and decided to go hunting in Aranjuez where it wasn’t as hot as in Toledo. But when he arrived there he received word that his chief advisor van Buijsleden was very ill and in life danger. He died a few days later on 23th of Augustus. Rumor had it that he was poisoned. Philip started to fear that there might be some truth to the warnings of Louis XII that the Spanish were ruthless and didn’t hesitate to use violence to get their way.

Now that the most important opponent to the idea of Joanna and Philip as heirs of the throne was out of the way things finally picked up speed and Joanna, Philip and their children were accepted as the heirs of the Spanish throne on 7th of October. But Philip didn’t feel safe any more after what happened to van Buijsleden. He was afraid that he would meet a similar fate and he wrote that he wouldn’t be able to breathe properly until he was home in Flanders. But even after the ceremonies the Spanish didn’t want to let Joanna and Philip go. It turned out that Joanna was pregnant again and the Spanish saw this as a great opportunity to finally have one of their grandchildren close to them. Philip insisted that he couldn’t possibly stay any longer because Flanders needed him, but he agreed to leave Joanna in Spain until the birth of their child. Philip left Joanna behind in December 1502. Joanna was extremely unhappy about this arrangement. She got into fights with her mother and she even cursed at her. She wanted to be with Philip! She wanted to take a ship and set sails to Flanders but her mother wouldn’t allow it. She first made Joanna believe that she would be able to travel after Philip “soon” but it eventually dawned upon Joanna that this wasn’t true. Isabella sent Joanna to Medina del Campo in the North of Spain  where she was “discreetly guarded”.

medina del campo 1

Medina del campo

It would take months before Joanna was free again!

buenas noches mis amigos! Hilde

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “To be king or not to be king, that’s the question

  1. Is it not horrible that Isabella of Castile did not let Juana go to her husband? And Isabella of Castile was a great believer in the husband and wife relationship. I do not think it is right. I think Isabella of Castile should have let Juana of Castile go. Do not forget Isabella of Castile was a woman who deprived the rightful Queen of Castile of her crown, that is Juana la Beltranjha and she kept her own mother, Isabella of Portugal, second wife of Isabella of Castile’s father, King Juan the Second of Castile locked up as well until the poor woman’s death in 1495.

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    • Not to mention the terrible way she expelled the Jews first to Portugal and then demanding that the Portuguese would do the same. And the infamous inquisition. She may have lived in a hot country, but she behaved like an ice-queen.

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  2. Pingback: Philips the Handsome finally in France | hemmahoshilde (@Hilde's home)

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  5. Pingback: Joanna finally free to leave :) | hemmahoshilde (@Hilde's home)

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  7. Actually the Jewish situation in Portugal did not have anything to do with Isabella of Castile but her elder daughter, the Princess Isabella of Portugal. She was a young widow and apparently that marriage had been happy and the Infanta Isabella did not want to wed again but King Manuel was instistant. He knew her from when she lived in Portugal and he greatly liked her and Isabella of Castile had wanted the alliance and she had told the Princess of Portugal that she had given her a lot of time to mourn young Prince Alfonso and it was time for her to do her duty to Spain. So the Princess Isabella had said she would wed with KIng Manuel but that Portugal was infested with Jews and if the King of Portugal would wed with her, he must rid Portugal of the Jews and so it happened.

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